Where’s the Man? Send in Your Pics!


This week the man was on top of Mt. Marcy, as sported by our very own instructors, Josh Martin and Paul Cunningham from Northern Cairn!

WMA has these new t-shirts that are given out to everybody on a WMA course (with the exception of a WFA course), featuring a da Vinci-inspired design of the Vitruvian Man. We are asking students, instructors, and like-minded individuals to send in their pictures to . We’d like to know where the picture was shot, and we will feature your post right here on our blog! Don’t forget to send us a story to attach to your submission!

Check back to see where the man has been traveling to!

Lance Armstrong Self-Splinting

Last week Lance Armstrong fell in a bike race crash and broke his right collar bone. Earlier I sent a video link to @wildmed by Twitter (http://www.rtve.es/mediateca/videos/20090323/armstrong-cae-abandona-castilla-leon/455839.shtml) that shows how he is self-splinting his injury while waiting for medical help. All signs point to unstable.

This photo shows the surgical site 3 days later. This is interesting for wilderness medicine students because it shows management of a high risk wound 3 days post incision. The area has obviously been cleaned. Steri strips and sutures are holding the wound edges together. The whole package is being covered by a clear view site to protect it from dirt and debris. When the wound is not being inspected it is splinted.

Picture #1

Picture #2

Picture #3

This is the post op video where he shows the x-ray:


Exclusive Post-Op Interview with Lance — powered by http://www.livestrong.com

A Weekend of Wilderness First Aid

CLICK HERE for a great summary of one student’s Wilderness First Aid course offered by UCSB, which includes pictures! The course was attended by 51 students and taught by WMA Instructors Jeff Baierlein, Rodney Tucknott, and Charles Schonder.

How did you enjoy your WFA course?

Student From Ohio University

“My name is Chris and I have recently taken the WFR class at Ohio University Dec. 13-21. I just wanted to let you know how amazing my experience was. It all started with my absolutely outstanding instructors Darren “Daz” and Gary. My attention never strayed the entire week as I listened to every word. I was thrilled to go to class everyday and even dreamed about it every night. I wish my high school and college career were this interesting my classes would have been a breeze. Not only was I able to learn how to be a WFR but I also feel I learned something about myself too. This is one of the best weeks I have had and I hope your program continues to grow. Please continue to chose people like Daz and Gary to teach your classes and I am sure your program will have limitless success.”

Cross Country Skiers and Compartment Syndrome

In the musculoskeletal system lecture WFR students learn about the signs and symptoms of compartment syndrome. Repetitive stress is a cause for compartment syndrome to the lower legs.

These two articles are accounts from Olympic ski racers that are suffering from compartment syndrome.

http://www.fasterskier.com/racing6146.html

http://www.cccski.com/main.asp?cmd=doc&ID=5429&lan=0

Submitted by:
Greg Friese, MS, NREMT-P, WEMT
President, Emergency Preparedness Systems LLC

These WFR dreams are getting crazy!

During a Wilderness First Responder course at the University of WI at LaCrosse, Ann Dunphy, one of WMA’s instructor’s, asked students about WFR dreams, as she does with all of her courses. Interestingly enough, one student, D. Crye, was willing to share his story, and thankfully for us, he also shared it with the WMA office. We just had to post it!

“Did anyone leave a plastic bag in the refrigerator with a Leatherman Blast, smartwool socks and V8 Butternut Squash soup? Let me know!

Also, for those who want to hear a dream I had last night feel free to keep reading; I’ll make it short. I dreamt last night that I got to save a guy from drowning in a river after he drove into a frozen lake. It was crazy because we got him out of the water and carried him up a very steep bank. As we got him onto the street he starting throwing up gallon after gallon of water. It was a lot of water! The whole time we were trying to keep him stabilized because we were MOI spine of course. Well this guy didn’t want to stay still but we finally got him to stay laying down as we waited for the ambulance. But I was so excited that I was able to help rescue someone that I left my patient (not a good thing) to go tell Ann, who was down the road at some outdoor store purchasing a new first aid kit. I got there and started telling Ann how great it was and everything and then she was like “David, where is your patient now?” And I told her he was laying in the middle of the street by himself. So Ann said “Get back to your patient now!” So, I ran back. When I got back to my patient the ambulance had arrived and had him on a stretcher, but they also had two other people on stretchers too! I was freaking out because somehow there were 3 patients instead of just one! Furthermore, all of them were strapped down on there backs throwing up everywhere uncontrollably. I then sat down and started to realize all that I did wrong. First of all, I didn’t complete the first triangle to find out how many patients there were. Secondly, I didn’t complete a full SAMPLE history because I must have missed something because everyone was throwing up big time from something. And I shouldn’t have left my patient to go tell Ann what had happened. So, I learned some good lessons from my dream. These WFR dreams are getting crazy!

Hypothermia Wrap Construction and Use

The hypothermia wrap is for more than just severe hypothermia patients. It can be used for any patient that may be experiencing a cold challenge and is not able to adequately generate their own heat. For example, a skier with a lower extremity injury awaiting evacuation has cold challenge on their problem list.

Videos
Wilderness Medical Associates lead instructors Greg Friese and Kevin Collopy quickly review basic hypothermia wrap construction in this video.

Hypothermia Wrap Construction and Use

The hypothermia wrap is for more than just severe hypothermia patients. It can be used for any patient that may be experiencing a cold challenge and is not able to adequately generate their own heat. For example, a skier with a lower extremity injury awaiting evacuation has cold challenge on their problem list.

Videos

Wilderness Medical Associates lead instructors Greg Friese and Kevin Collopy quickly review basic hypothermia wrap construction in this video.

In the second video Greg and Kevin add an active rewarming device called the Mini-Rescue Warming Blanket from RG Medical Diagnostics. (www.rgmd.com)

What else can you do to keep a patient warm and protected from a cold challenge?

Submitted by:
Greg Friese, MS, NREMT-P, WEMT
President, Emergency Preparedness Systems LLC